Distant Healing Circle

When dear friends shared the stunning news of their son’s serious health challenge, I reacted the way you probably would by saying “I’m so sorry.  Is there anything I can do?”

Instead of the expected “No, but thank you.”, his mother said, “Yes, actually there is.  Let’s form a healing circle for him.”

A healing circle is a gathering of people who combine their individual power to send intense healing energy to the person in need.  While we set the intention for our desired outcome, we surrender to the knowledge that healing takes many forms & the outcome is not ours to control.  In the ceremony, I often say a prayer that includes a sentence such as- “May this healing energy be used for the person’s highest good.”  Under no circumstances do we imply that this replaces medical care of any kind.  Energy healing complements medical treatment but does not replace it.

When designing a distant healing ceremony, I ask several questions including–

  1. Does the person give us consent to perform the ceremony?
  2. Is the person willing to attune to our efforts on the specified date & time?
  3. What do I need to know about the person to facilitate the healing session?

I ask these questions because, first & foremost, the individual has to want the healing.  Second, the person has to be an active participant , doing everything in his/her power to affect change.  Third, details about the person give us a single-minded focus for the work we are about to perform.

All aspects of the healing circle are created with a combination of intuitive insights & good old-fashioned hard work & planning.  On the surface, I design & facilitate rituals & ceremonies.  On a deeper level, I co-create them with those involved, making each experience beautiful, meaningful, & extremely personal.  Customized rituals & ceremonies alter the participants in profound ways– inspiring, connecting, & reaffirming the inherent worth of each of us.

Ceremonies & rituals honoring our special moments should be as unique as we are.

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Festival of the Dead

I have to say it, I find traditional, “American” rituals & ceremonies inadequate at best.  Regimented funerals, commercialized holidays, insipid baby showers, & meaningless bachelorette parties are just a few examples.  At worst, the ritual is missing altogether, like Coming of Age ceremonies for our youth.  If you say, “What about prom night or high school graduation?”, you’re proving the point.  Prom night is about the dress & staying up past midnight while our graduation ceremonies couldn’t be more generic.

I’ve taken to designed more deeply meaningful ceremonies.  This week, I created a Festival of the Dead for those who wanted to honor the deceased in a non-traditional way.  I prepared an altar with a white candle symbolizing the living & a black candle symbolizing the dead, along with other symbolic items.  Participants brought photos & objects of those they wished to recognize that night.  We created a sacred space by reciting poetry, learning about death ceremonies from other cultures, & sharing personal stories about those who had passed.

People of various cultures believe the veil between the worlds is lifted at this time of year so the spirits can travel from the other world to this one.  We made space for them by leaving an empty chair, welcome them among us, & taking a moment of silence to intuitively hear what messages they may bring.  The departed can live in our hearts & minds though they are physically gone from this world.

One participant posed the question, “Are funerals meant for the dead or the living?”  Both.  When we honor the dead, we’re recognizing our relationship with that person or animal.  Naturally, a sensitively-designed ceremony must be an extension of that relationship, meaningful to everyone involved– living or dead.  Every ritual we perform should be unique.  As you plan a special event to honor a rite of passage or a holiday that you celebrate, question what you do & why you do it.  If the ceremony doesn’t resonate with you in a powerful way, change it or enlist the help of someone who can help you.

For those who have passed, rest in peace.  For those still among the living, peace to you, too.