Things We Don’t Talk About screening

I’m extremely honored to be co-hosting Things We Don’t Talk About: Women’s Stories from the Red Tent with the award-winning filmmaker, Dr. Isadora Gabrielle Leidenfrost in October.  I’ve seen this ground-breaking film several times and cannot wait to share it with both the women & men in my community.

Things We Don't Talk About screening comes to York PA

Things We Don’t Talk About screening comes to York PA

Dr. Leidenfrost created this amazing documentary to chronicle the Red Tent movement that was sweeping the United States at the time she was filming.  Just 2 short years after it’s release, the Red Tent movement is now a worldwide phenomenon.  (On a personal note, it’s this movie that inspired me to start a tent in York PA.)

I’m thrilled that men are welcome to the screening, not just because they’ve been curious about what goes on inside the tent but also because they have mothers, sisters, daughters, girlfriends, and wives.  What impacts women impacts men and they need to be welcomed in the conversation about how we nourish each other and care for ourselves in a sacred space.  Though they cannot stay for the Red Tent celebration after the screening, the men will get a picture of what women do once the flap closes and we are sitting in sisterhood.  Briefly put, the Red Tent movement allows women a safe place to share their stories, nurture themselves, hear the wisdom of others, & honor the divine within.

While I’ve written about the Red Tent movement & my role in it before, this screening with Dr. Leidenfrost takes it to a whole new level.  May women and men find the experience profoundly moving and inspirational!

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The Ultimate To-Do List

1.  Listen to my heart more & my brain less.

2.  Give myself unconditional love & acceptance.

3.  Say “Yes!” to the Universe.

Say Yes to the Universe

Say Yes to the Universe

Kundalini Rising

It started as a dream.  No, it started with an escalating restlessness, an adult version of “growing pains”; then came the dream…

I went up to the counter to buy a snake.  The salesperson grabbed a large one, as wide around as my forearm & shoved it into a white plastic shopping bag.  This took considerable effort as the snake coiled tightly around her arm, struggling against its confinement.  I reluctantly took it & held the bag against my body as I walked to the car, the entire time thinking, “I just wanted a cute little garden variety snake, why am I bringing home this 6-8 foot long powerhouse that could strangle me or even eat my dogs?!  They scare the hell out of me.  Why am I doing this?”  I felt both the weight of that snake as I walked & it’s restless movement inside.

I set the bag on the passenger car seat and stood there staring at it in amazement; the bag wasn’t even tied shut!  I could see the snake’s head, the size of my open palm only narrower.  Again, the doubts banged around in my brain like a ball in an old-fashioned pinball game.  “I don’t have a tank and I wouldn’t want to give it a life trapped in a tank anyway.  Snakes should be free to slither & roam.  I don’t want to confine it.  What am I thinking?”

As it writhed & heaved inside the bag, I decided the only thing to do was take it back to the store.  Quickly, I snatched the open top of the bag, holding it at arm’s length away as I ran.  As I handed the bag back to the salesperson, the snake lunged out of the bag with all its power.  It stayed stiff the way my arm would if I pushed it out straight from my body, parallel to the ground.  Here was the snake, half out of the bag– straight & strong– and half coiled in the bag, ready to push out at any moment.

I pushed the bag forward, in a way trying to contain the snake & trap it inside.  It didn’t work.  I knew then that this was not something to play with.  Holding this snake humbled me.  I should not have this if I don’t know how to take care of it & dare I say, “control” it.  I felt remorseful because I know I take very good care of animals.  I just didn’t think I could manage this.

I’ve been studying the work of Robert Moss, founder of Active Dreaming, and he suggests giving a dream a title upon waking, for the title is often a clue as to its meaning.  I woke with the words “Kundalini Rising” in my head.  I know what kundalini energy is (Shakti energy, the divine source of all energy, the Holy Spirit within) and I know the snake is a symbol of it.  But what is “kundalini rising”?  The term was vaguely familiar but I had to do a little research.

When interpreting a dream,various meanings may come to mind but you’ll know when it’s the true meaning by the way it stirs your soul.  Honestly, it will just feel right.  The description on kundalinicare.com resonated deeply within me.  “… some form of sensitivity and yearning and a talent or quality that stands out to some degree.  Such an individual is more aware of the subtle aspects of life and is unsatisfied enough to seek more from life.  This may develop into an intense longing that urges the individual to find purpose, meaning, and spiritual life, if they are not unduly distracted into less satisfying temporary substitutes in the mean time.”

At this stage in my life, I recognize what’s happening.  I am going through growing pains of a sort. I can either rebel against it, fighting change every step of the way (a technique I’ve tried with immense failure over the years) or I can honor it & go with the flow.  Change is inevitable.  In fact, I desire change right now so I need to embrace it.  And more importantly, not get distracted by trivial concerns.  Be still.  Listen.  And worst of all… BE PATIENT.

These feelings and the accompanying messages in my dreams & awake life signal a time of important growth.  The snake represents my energy and as my boyfriend pointed out, even though I tried to contain it, the snake got out.  Kundalini energy was released.  This is a true calling.  When dreams like this occur or when you experience coincidences (which are, by the way, NOT an accident but synchronicity at work), you must honor them and work with what’s happening as its for your highest good anyway.  Notice I say “you” but actually mean “me”, too.  I’m learning all of this by trial and error.

I’ve finally learned that an important aspect of profound change is saying “Yes” to new opportunities as they arise.  We may know we are on a path but none of us can predict exactly where that path may lead.  It’s our job to stay open to possibilities and accept whatever happens as necessary for our individual evolution.